Google+ YA Romantics: November 2015

Monday, November 30, 2015

Just Finished Reading ... Thicker Than Water

Thicker Than Water
by Brigid Kemmerer

To be published on December 29, 2015
by Kensington Teen

Source: e-ARC for review from the publisher

Synopsis from Goodreads: Thomas Bellweather hasn’t been in town long. Just long enough for his newlywed mother to be murdered, and for his new stepdad’s cop colleagues to decide Thomas is the primary suspect. Not that there’s any evidence. But before Thomas got to Garretts Mill there had just been one other murder in twenty years. The only person who believes him is Charlotte Rooker, little sister to three cops and, with her soft hands and sweet curves, straight-up dangerous to Thomas. Her best friend was the other murder vic. And she’d like a couple answers. Answers that could get them both killed, and reveal a truth Thomas would die to keep hidden…
My take: I've read and enjoyed some of Brigid Kemmerer's Elementals books, and at first seemed like she was trying something entirely new with Thicker Than Water. Until about the halfway point, this book read like a contemporary YA murder mystery and everything seemed to have a bit of a cool Veronica Mars flair (there was a teenage murder victim named Lilly who was a friend of the main character).

But then pretty far into the story, things took a rather unexpected turn -- or perhaps a more expected turn? -- and this became very much like an Elementals book -- namely, there was suddenly a paranormal twist. (To be fair, maybe I should have seen this coming because Thicker Than Water has all the Elementals trademarks, like a family of brothers, a scrappy female love interest in the midst of all the testosterone, a misunderstood male protagonist, and a romance between the latter two.)

Pros: if you like the Elementals formula, as described above, you should definitely like this. Kemmerer is really good at writing guy characters and brothers. At first, I was really into the mystery, but mysteries that suddenly turn paranormal always seem like a bit of a cheat to me -- sorry!

Cons: Of all this author's heroines, Charlotte was not my favorite. She was quite the damsel in distress at first and had to be rescued (and carried through the woods!) not once but twice by the love interest. I expected her to drop a handkerchief or pull out her smelling salts to get his attention as her next move. Finally, toward the end, she came into her own. But I guess my greatest issue with this book was that I thought the paranormal aspect was introduced too late, which didn't leave enough time for it to be developed enough for my liking. The ending seemed rushed and left a few things unresolved - not sure if there are more books to follow.

If you're a fan of the Elementals books, you will definitely enjoy Thicker Than Water . If you're new to this author, you will have to see if you like the set-up and if you prefer the first two thirds of the book or the last third.

Friday, November 27, 2015

Freebie Friday: Happy Black Friday!



Happy Friday!
If you celebrated Thanksgiving, I hope yours was happy. (I just finished some dishes...)

I have three ARCs up for grabs this weekend:

Not If I See You First by Erik Lindstrom, which also includes a braille bookmark!
First & Then by Emma Mills
Young Widow's Club by Alexandra Coutts


Whether you're shopping or cleaning up or just having a regular Friday, I hope you have a good one!

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Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Hot Off the Presses: New YA Releasing Nov 24- 30

Hot Off the Presses -- brand new YA releases!

Welcome to Hot Off the Presses!  

Tuesday is book release day, so every Tuesday I tell you about all the great new YA books you can buy in the week to come. If you're a reviewer, you can also link your blog or Goodreads reviews of any YA book publishing in the current month so we can all check them out!

LAST week to enter the November giveaway!! Each month's winner can pick any book up to $15 on either Amazon (for US winner) or The Book Depository (for international winner.)

Enter by linking your reviews of YA books that release this month or by commenting on other people's linked reviews.

Hot Off the Presses aims to include every traditionally published YA book. Please let me know about books that came out this week that I might have missed! Some titles may have different release dates outside the US.

Click on the photos to get to each book's Goodreads page!

Queen Rules for 50/50 Chances Promises I Made
Queen (Blackcoat Rebellion #3) by Aimee Carter (Harlequin)
Rules for 50/50 Chances by Kate McGovern (FSG)
Promises I Made by Michelle Fink (Harper)



Reckless Hearts Undeniable Light of Day
Reckless Hearts (Wicked Games #2) by Sean Olin (Katherine Tegen)
Undeniable by Liz Bankes (Bloomsbury)
Light of Day by Allison van Diepen (Harper)


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Monday, November 23, 2015

Just Finished Reading ... Dangerous Lies

Dangerous Lies
by Becca Fitzpatrick

Published by Simon & Schuster
on November 10, 2015

Synopsis from Goodreads: Stella Gordon is not her real name. Thunder Basin, Nebraska, is not her real home. This is not her real life. After witnessing a lethal crime, Stella Gordon is sent to the middle of nowhere for her own safety before she testifies against the man she saw kill her mother’s drug dealer. But Stella was about to start her senior year with the boyfriend she loves. How can she be pulled away from the only life she knows and expected to start a new one in Nebraska? Stella chafes at her protection and is rude to everyone she meets. She’s not planning on staying long, so why be friendly? Then she meets Chet Falconer and it becomes harder to keep her guard up, even as her guilt about having to lie to him grows. As Stella starts to feel safer, the real threat to her life increases—because her enemies are actually closer than she thinks…
My take: I'm a huge fan of thrillers and very happy that they seem to be more of a thing now in YA. That said, I almost didn't read this. I read Fitzpatrick's prior thriller last year and had my issues with it. I thought Black Ice had an excellent premise, plus good suspense and plotting, but really unlikeable characters and Stockholm-syndrome-creepily-masquerading-as-romance.

Weirdly, I though Dangerous Lies had the exact opposite strengths and weaknesses:  likeable characters (Stella starts out a little bratty but goes through a lot of growth) and a sweet romance, but was seriously lacking in the suspense department for a book that was supposed to be a thriller.

Overall, I preferred Dangerous Lies to Black Ice because, to me, connection to the characters trumps plot. But as I lay on the couch flipping pages, I wished Dangerous Lies had been a little more thrilling. Stella, who is in witness protection because a scary drug dealer wants to kill her, seems in danger for about 5% of the book. The rest of the time, she's working as a carhop, playing softball, and going to church. There's technically a love triangle, but for some reason it didn't bother me. At the opening of the book, Stella and her boyfriend are sent to different witness protection locations and I guess in my mind, that was the equivalent of a break-up. But if you have love triangle issues, be forewarned. The plotting wasn't bad, but wasn't as twisty as Black Ice. I guessed one of the two main plot twist but did think they were well set-up.

All in all, I thought Dangerous Lies was a pretty good read, but I'd call it romantic suspense rather than a thriller.


Thursday, November 19, 2015

Just Finished Reading ... Not If I See You First

Not If I See You First
by Eric Windstorm

To be published on December 1, 2015
by Little, Brown BFYR

Source: ARC giveaway at BEA

Synopsis from Goodreads: Parker Grant doesn't need 20/20 vision to see right through you. That's why she created the Rules: Don't treat her any differently just because she's blind, and never take advantage. There will be no second chances. Just ask Scott Kilpatrick, the boy who broke her heart. When Scott suddenly reappears in her life after being gone for years, Parker knows there's only one way to react-shun him so hard it hurts. She has enough on her mind already, like trying out for the track team (that's right, her eyes don't work but her legs still do), doling out tough-love advice to her painfully naive classmates, and giving herself gold stars for every day she hasn't cried since her dad's death three months ago. But avoiding her past quickly proves impossible, and the more Parker learns about what really happened--both with Scott, and her dad--the more she starts to question if things are always as they seem. Maybe, just maybe, some Rules are meant to be broken.
My take: At BEA, the Little, Brown booth had some sort of a game that would determine the perfect book for you. I kept "winning" a book I'd already read and really didn't like. So shoutout to Danielle from Love at First Page, who was one of the people I was walking around with, and somehow figured out how to win Not If I See You First, which was the book I wanted. Thanks, Danielle! (But because I know you have a certain preference about endings, I don't recommend this book for you.)

But let's not get to that part yet. I loved 99% of this book SO much. Parker was my favorite kind of protagonist. (Prickly. I love prickly!) She's been through so much, gone through things that would make most of us just hide under the covers with Netflix for life, but not Parker. She's tough as nails -- I loved that she doesn't take any crap from anyone. She's also blind. And a runner. Yes, she's a bit in the mold of Hazel and Augustus -- whip-smart and mouthy and irreverent. She has a few close friends, but generally she's developed a hard armor that is her protection from the world.

But we soon discover that Parker has one weakness in that armor --Scott Kilpatrick. The two of them had a bit of a thing during middle school and then there was a big misunderstanding and she's been furious at him ever since. Luckily, the two of them went to different high schools, until  the district forced them to merge. And of course, guess who turns up in the desk next to Parker's?

Parker being Parker, she will have none of Scott's making nice to her, but continues in her snarky Parker ways, wearing a blindfold (I didn't quite get that; it was a bit like Augustus and his cigarette), sneaking out to go running, running an advice booth for the lovelorn with her friends, meeting a guy at the mall, and tormenting poor Molly, who's been assigned by the school to walk her around.

I loved the way that Not If I See You First addressed all the assumptions we make about others in our very visual culture.  And I loved Parker's riffs on how people treat the disabled. And I was happy that Parker showed such huge character growth. She starts off pretty judge-y and tough and by the end of the book had learned to "see" things from other points of view.

All that was great, but there was another aspect of the ending that was really disappointing. I'm completely okay with sad endings and unresolved endings and "that's just real life" endings. But I just felt that this book was giving me HUGE hints that it would have a certain kind of ending and then completely pulled the rug out on me.

Not If I See You First is still one of my favorite YA contemporaries this year, even if the ending bewildered and disappointed me.

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Hot Off the Presses: New YA Releasing Nov 17-23

Hot Off the Presses -- brand new YA releases!

Welcome to Hot Off the Presses!  

Tuesday is book release day, so every Tuesday I tell you about all the great new YA books you can buy in the week to come. If you're a reviewer, you can also link your blog or Goodreads reviews of any YA book publishing in the current month so we can all check them out!

Enter the November giveaway!! Each month's winner can pick any book up to $15 on either Amazon (for US winner) or The Book Depository (for international winner.)

Enter by linking your reviews of YA books that release this month or by commenting on other people's linked reviews.

Hot Off the Presses aims to include every traditionally published YA book. Please let me know about books that came out this week that I might have missed! Some titles may have different release dates outside the US.

New releases are slowing WAY down from now through December! Click on the photos to get to each book's Goodreads page!


Calvin Everything But the Truth Game of Lives
Calvin by Martine Levitt (FSG)
Everything But the Truth (If Only #6) by Mandy Hubbard (Bloomsbury)
The Game of Lives (Mortality Doctrine #3) by James Dasher (Delacorte)


Strange Girl Golden Braid Just Visiting

Strange Girl by Christopher Pike (Simon Pulse)
Golden Braid by Melanie Dickerson (Thomas Nelson)
Just Visiting by Dahlia Adler (Spencer Hill)



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Monday, November 16, 2015

Just Finished Reading ... This Raging Light by Estelle Laure

This Raging Light
by Estelle Laure

To be published by HMH
on December 22, 2015

Source: eARC for review from Netgalley

Synopsis from Goodreads: Can the best thing happen at the worst time? Her dad went crazy. Her mom left town. She has bills to pay and a little sister to look after. Now is not the time for level-headed seventeen-year-old Lucille to fall in love. But love—messy, inconvenient love—is what she's about to experience when she falls for Digby Jones, her best friend's brother.

My take:  I can usually tell if a book is for me after the first couple chapters, and This Raging Light had me worried from the get-go. I finished it, but my opinion didn't change. Here's the lowdown.

For me as a reader, this book was voice-y ... in the wrong kind of way. Years ago, I went to a lecture given by a very well-known lifestyle blogger and she said something that has stuck with me: a strong voice both attracts and repels. Voice-y books evoke those kinds of strong reactions in me. If a book's narrative voice feels authentic, I'm in love, and if not, reading that book feels like hearing nails on a chalkboard inside my head for 300 pages. I appreciate poetic writing, but in this case it just didn't resonate with me. Also, I didn't think Lucille's voice sounded anything like a real teenager. She would say things ("I made my whole self very still") that sounded more to me like something a small child would say. There were other characters whose dialogue just about drove me up all four walls. To me, quirk is like salt: it's fantastic until there's too much of it, and then everything is unpalatable.

I thought there was way too much plot. Lucille and her younger sister Wren have family trouble, and I had a lot of sympathy for them over that. But then there's a complicated romance. And friendship issues. And a mystery. Finally, there was a dramatic accident that had nothing to do with anything else.  At one point, one of the characters runs down all the stuff that's been happening and then says, "I have had enough." Me: slow clap.

This is my definition of a "ugh" romance. Not only does the main character fall in love with the twin brother of her best friend, the guy also has a very serious girlfriend. Ugh - why? Female characters, is it so much to ask that you find a teenage guy who is single and available? The romantic scenes between Lucille and Digby also struck me as awkward and cringe-y. Maybe that was intentional, but I found those parts hard to read.

There was an unresolved ending. After all that plot, almost none of it was resolved. Sigh.

Still, I can see on Goodreads that people are having very different reactions to this one, some extremely positive. So don't take my word for it -- if this sounds like something you'd like, give it a try! And if you read this and liked it, please give your take in comments!

Friday, November 13, 2015

Freebie Friday: Signed ARC of Soundless by Richelle Mead



Happy Friday! 


It's Friday the 13th but today is anything but unlucky --I'm giving away a signed ARC of Soundless. Open to US/Canadian addresses!



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Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Just Finished Reading ... Young Widows Club by Alexandra Coutts

Young Widows Club
by Alexandra Coutts

Published on November 10, 2015
by Farrar, Straus and Giroux BYR

Synopsis from Goodreads: For seventeen-year-old Tam, running off to marry her musician boyfriend is the ideal escape from her claustrophobic high-school life on the island, and the ultimate rebellion against her father and stepmother. But when Tam becomes a widow just weeks later, the shell-shocked teen is forced to find her way forward by going back to the life she thought she’d moved beyond—even as her struggle to deal with her grief is forcing her to reinvent herself and reach out to others in ways she never imagined.

My take: I enjoyed Tumble & Fall, Alexandra Coutts's last book, so I wanted to try Young Widows Club. And I did enjoy this one too, despite the weird (for YA, that is) title and premise.

First, let's talk about the weirdness, of which there was quite a bit. The premise of the book is that seventeen year-old Tamsen marries her nineteen year-old boyfriend, and then he dies. I've read a YA book in which the main characters want to get married because one of them is about to be deported. I've read dystopian YA in which the characters are forced into a polygamous marriage or just forced into marriage. In fact, in YA dystopians and fairy tales, teens being forced into marriage is a common plot point.

So why did Tamsen and Noah (willingly) get married? The blurb suggests that she was trying to "escape from her claustrophobic life on the island," but that doesn't seem accurate to me. You don't need to be married to say, leave the island to go to college on the mainland. And after these teen lovebirds tie the knot, they don't escape from the island at all. They live in a Tiny House that Noah's dad built them. A house that's right next to Noah's parents' house. Uh, claustrophobic much?

Why does Tamsen say she got married? As she explains it, "I knew I wanted to spend the rest of my life with Noah. Why wait?" Uh, because you're a seventeen year-old who can't even get married in the state of Massachusetts without parental permission. Because you haven't finished high school yet.

Next we have the problem of the inaccurate title. While "young widows club" is a very catchy one, there is really no such thing in the book. Yes, Tamsen joins a grief support group that is filled with widows and widowers. Many are relatively young, though Tamsen, that cruel girl, calls them "middle aged"...  Sorry to break it to you, but there is no club of teenaged widows.

But when I managed to get past the gimmicky quality of the title and premise, I really liked this book. It's a quiet contemporary and I thought it was a moving grief story -- maybe one of the best grief stories that I've read recently. After Noah's death, Tamsen is confused. She's angry. She feels lost and alone. Many grief books add drama by having a character die under some sort of questionable circumstances, but Young Widows Club has Noah die in his sleep from some undiagnosed, congenital condition. I thought that was an interesting choice, because it made the book all about the grief.

The book's whole set-up was beautifully done as well. I think one of the hardest things about grief and loss is that the world just spins along, which feels confusing and wrong. In the story, Noah was in a band, and Tamsen has to deal with the fact that the band decides to move on without him, and to continue to use their old songs, many of which were written about Tamsen by Noah. There's a strong family element, as Tamsen's mother died when she was young and Tamsen's father remarried and had two more children. I really liked the way Tam's father had to struggle to come to terms with some of the ways he'd failed her as a parent as a result of his own grief, and how he worked hard to finally be the dad that she needed. And I loved the way the book showed that, in a grief situation, sometimes the people you thought you could count on let you down, but then you find support in completely unexpected places.

Okay, there's a bit more weirdness I didn't mention before. Let's just get it over with quickly, like pulling off a band-aid: Tamsen starts to fall for an older (*cough* twenty-six year-old *cough*) guy. In a regular YA without married teenagers who want to escape yet don't and then become widows, this kind of relationship would have been a huge deal breaker for me. But given all the other weirdness, I actually thought it worked. Go figure. It was a slow-moving and somewhat bumpy romance, which helped.

tl;tr: In the end, I really liked this. It's a very different book that you might expect, given the title. But if you're looking for a quiet sort of grief book, I suggest you give it a try.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Hot Off the Presses: New YA Releasing Nov 10-16

Hot Off the Presses -- brand new YA releases!

Welcome to Hot Off the Presses!  

Tuesday is book release day, so every Tuesday I tell you about all the great new YA books you can buy in the week to come. If you're a reviewer, you can also link your blog or Goodreads reviews of any YA book publishing in the current month so we can all check them out!

Enter the November giveaway!! Each month's winner can pick any book up to $15 on either Amazon (for US winner) or The Book Depository (for international winner.)

Enter by linking your reviews of YA books that release this month or by commenting on other people's linked reviews.

Hot Off the Presses aims to include every traditionally published YA book. Please let me know about books that came out this week that I might have missed! Some titles may have different release dates outside the US.

Click on the photos to get to each book's Goodreads page!


Soundless Winter For the Record
Soundless by Richelle Mean (Razorbill)
Winter (Lunar Chronicles #4) by Marissa Meyer (Feiwel and Friends)
For the Record by Charlotte Huang (Delacorte)


Young Widows Club All the Major Constellations Serendipity's Footsteps
Young Widows Club by Alexandra Coutts (FSG)
All the Major Constellations by Pratima Cranse (Viking)
Serendipity's Footsteps by Suzanne Nelson (Knopf)


DaVinci's Tiger Autumn's Kiss If Only
DaVinci's Tiger by L. M. Elliott (Katherine Tegen)
Autumn's Kiss (Autumn Falls #2) by Bella Thorne (Delacorte)
If Only by Richard Paul Evans (Simon Pulse)



Darkness Hidden Dangerous Lies August Five
Darkness Hidden (Name of the Blade #2) by Zoe Marriott (Candlewick)
Dangerous Lies by Becca Fitzpatrick (Simon & Schuster)
The August 5 by Jenna Helland (FSG)


Unforgiven Triple Moon Consent This Way Home
Unforgiven (Fallen #5) by Lauren Kate (Delacorte)
Triple Moon by Melissa de la Cruz (Putnam)
Consent by Nancy Ohlin (Simon Pulse)
This Way Home by Wes Moore and Shawn Goodman (Knopf)

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Monday, November 9, 2015

Just Finished Reading ... Soundless by Richelle Mead

Soundless
by Richelle Mead

To be published
on Nov 10, 2015
by Razorbill

Source: ARC giveaway at BEA

Synopsis from Goodreads: For as long as Fei can remember, there has been no sound in her village, where rocky terrain and frequent avalanches prevent residents from self-sustaining. Fei and her people are at the mercy of a zipline that carries food up the treacherous cliffs from Beiguo, a mysterious faraway kingdom. When villagers begin to lose their sight, deliveries from the zipline shrink and many go hungry. Fei’s home, the people she loves, and her entire existence is plunged into crisis, under threat of darkness and starvation. But soon Fei is awoken in the night by a searing noise, and sound becomes her weapon.

My take:  Overall, I enjoyed reading Soundless. I'm a huge Richelle Mead fan and after reading so many of her books set in the VA world, it was fun to see her write something set in a completely different place and time, not to mention a standalone. Other pluses for me were Fei's character, her relationship with her sister, and the challenge that Mead set herself in writing a book featuring characters who can't hear and therefore don't speak, only sign. At first, the italicized signed-dialogue was a little odd, but I quickly got used to it. And I really love this cover (way more than the VA ones...)

I also loved the whole set-up of the book. It's hard to explain, but it felt a little like a folk story or a fable: a group of people beset with a mysterious, unexplained affliction, an unseen enemy, and the unlikely hero(one) who will save them all. Soundless isn't that short (272 pages) but I still kept feeling like I was reading something that wasn't a novel, like a story or a novella. As a rather reluctant fantasy reader, I can't believe I'm saying this, but I could have used even more fantasy/paranormal elements, even if that added a few more pages to the story. I think fantasy books need that 350+ page length to get in all the world building that readers expect.

But all in all, I ecommend this if you're up for something short and self-contained!

Friday, November 6, 2015

Freebie Friday November 6: ARC Grab Bag



Happy Friday!


Today I have another ARC Grab Bag. Check out my Instagram for a sneak peek at the titles up for grabs! (US only)

If you're visiting me on Instagram, be sure to check out my new Instagram giveaway -- you can win a hardcover ARC of These Shallow Graves (US only; enter through Nov 9.)


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Thursday, November 5, 2015

Cover Chat: Thoughts on Some Recent YA Covers




I was going to do a Cover Trends post and decided that what I wanted to talk about encompassed more then trends, so welcome to ...  Cover Chat!

Lookalike Covers:

I'm always a believer that great minds can think alike, but I also think covers that are too similar can cause confusion. When I saw the cover (below) for The August 5, I really thought it was a new installment in the Witch and Wizard series. And if we are talking trends, these are both variations on the Great Balls of Fire cover trend, which I've talked about in a prior blog post.

pic name pic name


YA or Women's Fiction?
I'm not sure if someone put these books in front of me with no context, I'd guess that these were YA. Especially a book called "Young Widow's Club." (I'll have a lot more to say about this book next week when I review it.)The sister cover is pretty, but to me its brightness doesn't really fit the dark themes of the book, which is about a sister suicide pact. (Can't read that one, but if you have, let me know your thoughts in comments.)

Favorite Recent Cover Reveal:


I've loved all the covers in this series. I should point out that they fall into the trend of Watercolor Covers, which what I called covers that have a lot of white space and contrasting bright colors in this past cover post.  I'm really, really excited for this book.

What are some of your favorite (or least favorite) recent covers? Tell me in comments so I can check them out!

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Just Finished Reading .... We'll Never Be Apart by Emiko Jean

We'll Never Be Apart
by Emiko Jean

Published on October 6, 2015
by HMH Books for Young Readers

Source: eARC for review from publisher

Synopsis from Goodreads: Murder. Fire. Revenge. That’s all seventeen-year-old Alice Monroe thinks about. Committed to a mental ward at Savage Isle, Alice is haunted by memories of the fire that killed her boyfriend, Jason. A blaze her twin sister Cellie set. But when Chase, a mysterious, charismatic patient, agrees to help her seek vengeance, Alice begins to rethink everything. Writing out the story of her troubled past in a journal, she must confront hidden truths.

My take: If you're looking to prolong that creepy Halloween feeling, this is definitely a book you should consider adding to your list. Alice has ben committed to a mental institution after a fire that killed her boyfriend. The doctors seem to think that she set the fire, but Alice knows the truth: it was actually her twin sister Cellie. Desperate for revenge, Alice hatches a plot to find her sister and make her pay for what she did...

I enjoyed this one. It felt a little like a cross between Girl, Interrupted and White Oleander. Alice and Cellie have had a tough life -- after the death of their grandfather, the sisters have shuttled from foster home to foster home. They have a tight bond, but it feels like that Alice must break free of her more troubled sister in order to move forward.

Am I weird that I'm kind of fascinated by stories set in psychiatric hospitals? One of my favorite parts of the story was the relationship between Alice and her roommate. The sort-of-romance with Chase worried me a bit, but it worked for me because it seemed like she was (mostly) using him to help her get to her sister.

The ending was interesting. I was surprised by it in a couple of ways. I think I was expecting something a little more out-there.  But all in all, I really enjoyed this -- a perfect October read!

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Hot Off the Presses: New YA Releasing Nov 3-9

Hot Off the Presses -- brand new YA releases!

Welcome to Hot Off the Presses!  

Tuesday is book release day, so every Tuesday I tell you about all the great new YA books you can buy in the week to come. If you're a reviewer, you can also link your blog or Goodreads reviews of any YA book publishing in the current month so we can all check them out!

NEW November giveaway!! Each month's winner can pick any book up to $15 on either Amazon (for US winner) or The Book Depository (for international winner.)

Enter by linking reviews of YA books that release that month or by commenting on other people's linked reviews.

Hot Off the Presses aims to include every traditionally published YA book. Please let me know about books that came out this week that I might have missed! Some titles may have different release dates outside the US.

Click on the photos to get to each book's Goodreads page!


Revolution of Ivy Anatomical Shape of a Heart Lies About Truth
The Revolution of Ivy (Book of Ivy #2) by Amy Engel (Entangled)
The Anatomical Shape of a Heart by Jenn Bennett (Feiwel and Friends)
The Lies About Truth by Courtney C. Stevens (Harper)


Hotel Ruby Until We Meet Again How to Be Brave
Hotel Ruby by Suzanne Young (Simon Pulse)
Until We Meet Again by Renee Collins (Sourcebooks)
How to Be Brave by E. Katherine Kottaras (St. Martin's)


All In Sister Pact Manners and Mutiny
All In (The Naturals #3) by Jennifer Lynn Barnes (Disney Hyperion)
The Sister Pact by Stacie Ramey (Sourcebooks)
Traffic (Tricks #2) by Ellen Hopkins (Margaret McElderry)



Ten Thousand Skies Above You NEED Manners and Mutiny
Ten Thousand Skies Above You (Firebird #2) by Claudia Gray (Harper)
NEED by Joelle Charbonneau (HMH)
Manners and Mutiny (Finishing School #4) by Gail Carrier (Little, Brown)


Forget Tomorrow Conjurer's Riddle Captive
Forget Tomorrow by Pintip Dunn (Entangled)
The Conjurer's Riffle (Inventor's Secret #2) by Andrea Cremer (Philomela)
Captive by A. J. Grainger (Simon & Schuster)


Fearless Hollow Girl Girl with the Wrong Name
Fearless (Arena #3) by Marianne Curley (Bloomsbury)
Hollow Girl (Twinmaker #3) by Sean Williams (Balzer + Bray)
Girl with the Wrong Name by Barnabas Miller (Soho)


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